The Progression of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Lifestyle Intervention in Older Adults

Xiaofang Jia, Hisao Naito, Kazuya Kitamori, Husna Yetti, Tamie Nakajima

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide. It encompasses a spectrum of liver histology in individuals who drink little or no alcohol, ranging from simple fatty liver (steatosis), through fat accompanied by signs of hepatocyte injury, mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and variable hepatic fibrosis (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Approximately 19.0% of the general United States population has NAFLD, and around 11.8% of NAFLD patients develop NASH. The prevalence, severity, and progression of NAFLD/NASH are significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome components, especially obesity and diabetes, and are also governed by the interactive effects of age, sex, genetic susceptibility, and lifestyle (diet and exercise). In particular, advanced age is associated with disease severity and fibrosis progression. A combination of dietary modification and physical activity is the cornerstone of NAFLD management, as there is a lack of efficacious and safe pharmacotherapy for this disease.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFoods and Dietary Supplements in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease in Older Adults
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages85-97
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9780124186866
ISBN (Print)9780124186804
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27-01-2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fatty Liver
Life Style
Fibrosis
Exercise
Diet Therapy
Liver
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Disease Management
Liver Diseases
Hepatocytes
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Histology
Obesity
Fats
Alcohols
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Diet
Drug Therapy
Wounds and Injuries
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Jia, X., Naito, H., Kitamori, K., Yetti, H., & Nakajima, T. (2015). The Progression of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Lifestyle Intervention in Older Adults. In Foods and Dietary Supplements in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease in Older Adults (pp. 85-97). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-418680-4.00009-9
Jia, Xiaofang ; Naito, Hisao ; Kitamori, Kazuya ; Yetti, Husna ; Nakajima, Tamie. / The Progression of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Lifestyle Intervention in Older Adults. Foods and Dietary Supplements in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease in Older Adults. Elsevier Inc., 2015. pp. 85-97
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Jia, X, Naito, H, Kitamori, K, Yetti, H & Nakajima, T 2015, The Progression of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Lifestyle Intervention in Older Adults. in Foods and Dietary Supplements in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease in Older Adults. Elsevier Inc., pp. 85-97. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-418680-4.00009-9

The Progression of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Lifestyle Intervention in Older Adults. / Jia, Xiaofang; Naito, Hisao; Kitamori, Kazuya; Yetti, Husna; Nakajima, Tamie.

Foods and Dietary Supplements in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease in Older Adults. Elsevier Inc., 2015. p. 85-97.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Jia X, Naito H, Kitamori K, Yetti H, Nakajima T. The Progression of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Lifestyle Intervention in Older Adults. In Foods and Dietary Supplements in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease in Older Adults. Elsevier Inc. 2015. p. 85-97 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-418680-4.00009-9