The relationship between upper limb function and activities of daily living without the effects of lower limb function: A cross-sectional study

Haruka Yamamoto, Kazuya Takeda, Soichiro Koyama, Keisuke Morishima, Yuichi Hirakawa, Ikuo Motoya, Hiroaki Sakurai, Yoshikiyo Kanada, Nobutoshi Kawamura, Mami Kawamura, Shigeo Tanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Upper limb motor function and activities of daily living (ADL) are related in chronic stroke patients. This study investigated this relationship after removal of the influence of motor function of the affected lower limb, which until now has remained unclear. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study included 53 patients with chronic stroke. Upper and lower limb motor function and ADL were assessed using the Fugl-Meyer assessment of the upper (FMA-UL) and lower limbs (FMA-LL) and functional independence measure motor score (FIM-M). To clarify the relationship between FMA-UL and total FIM-M before and after removal of the influence of FMA-LL, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient and partial correlation analysis were used. The relationship between FMA-UL and each item of FIM-M after removal of the influence of FMA-LL was assessed using partial correlation analysis. Results: Before the influence of FMA-LL was removed, FMA-UL was moderately to well correlated with total FIM-M. This became weak after the influence was removed. Regarding each item of FIM-M, FMA-UL was correlated with dressing (upper body), toileting, and walking or wheelchair after removal of the influence. Conclusion: The relationship between upper limb motor function and ADL is strongly influenced by lower limb motor function.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Occupational Therapy
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Occupational Therapy

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