Time-series analysis comparing the prevalence of antibodies against nine viral species found in umbilical cord blood in Japan

Koji Takemoto, Naoko Nishimura, Kei Kozawa, Hiromi Hibino, Masahiro Kawaguchi, Suguru Takeuchi, Naozumi Fujishiro, Sakiko Arai, Kensei Gotoh, Haruki Hosono, Takao Ozaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the prevalence of antibodies against 9 viral species found in umbilical cord blood from 561 neonates in 2013. Serum IgG antibodies against the following viruses were measured: Herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), measles virus (MV), rubella virus (RV), mumps virus (MuV), and human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19). A survey questionnaire regarding past medical history and maternal immunization status for the vaccine-preventable diseases of varicella, measles, rubella, and mumps was simultaneously administered. The results were compared with previous data collected in 2001–2002 from 378 umbilical cord blood samples. Viral seroprevalence data were: HSV, 54%;VZV,96%;EBV,96%;CMV,67%;HHV-6,100%;MV,95%; RV, 94%;MuV,64%;and HPV B19, 55%. The seroprevalence of CMV, MV, and MuV were significantly lower in 2013 than in 2001–2002 (CMV, 76%; MV,98%; MuV,93%). Compared with the 2001–2002 data, the mean IgG antibody values of the 4 vaccine-preventable diseases were significantly lower, and vaccination coverage for those diseases among mothers was significantly higher. Thus, attention should be paid to antibody levels in women of childbearing age in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-318
Number of pages5
JournalJapanese journal of infectious diseases
Volume69
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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