Tooth loss and mortality in elderly japanese adults: Effect of oral care

Kazuki Hayasaka, Yasutake Tomata, Jun Aida, Takashi Watanabe, Masako Kakizaki, Ichiro Tsuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To assess whether oral care (tooth brushing, regular dental visits, and use of dentures) affects mortality in elderly individuals with tooth loss. Design A 4-year prospective cohort study. Setting Ohsaki City, Japan. Participants Twenty-one thousand seven hundred thirty community-dwelling individuals aged 65 and older. Measurements In a baseline survey in 2006, data were collected on number of remaining teeth and oral care status as measures of dental health. Data were also collected on age, sex, education level, smoking, alcohol drinking, time spent walking daily, medical history, psychological distress, and energy and protein intake as covariates. During the 4-year follow-up between 2006 and 2010, information on mortality was obtained from Ohsaki City government. Results The multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazards model showed an inverse dose-response relationship between number of remaining teeth and mortality (P for trend <.001). In participants with 0 to 19 teeth, practicing oral care was inversely associated with mortality. The multivariate hazard ratio for mortality in participants who practiced all three types of oral care was 0.54 (95% confidence interval = 0.45-0.64), compared with participants who practiced none of the three. Conclusion Tooth brushing, regular dental visits, and use of dentures are inversely associated with mortality in elderly individuals with tooth loss.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)815-820
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume61
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27-05-2013

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Tooth Loss
Tooth
Mortality
Dentures
Independent Living
Local Government
Sex Education
Energy Intake
Proportional Hazards Models
Alcohol Drinking
Walking
Japan
Cohort Studies
Smoking
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Psychology
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Hayasaka, Kazuki ; Tomata, Yasutake ; Aida, Jun ; Watanabe, Takashi ; Kakizaki, Masako ; Tsuji, Ichiro. / Tooth loss and mortality in elderly japanese adults : Effect of oral care. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2013 ; Vol. 61, No. 5. pp. 815-820.
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Tooth loss and mortality in elderly japanese adults : Effect of oral care. / Hayasaka, Kazuki; Tomata, Yasutake; Aida, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi; Kakizaki, Masako; Tsuji, Ichiro.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 61, No. 5, 27.05.2013, p. 815-820.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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