Transient drug-primed but persistent cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished methamphetamine-seeking behavior in mice

Yijin Yan, Kiyofumi Yamada, Atsumi Nitta, Toshitaka Nabeshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is essential to develop animal models to study the role of genetic factors in the relapse of drug-seeking behavior in genetically engineered mutant mice. This paper reports a typical model of drug-primed and cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished methamphetamine (METH)-seeking behavior in mice. C57BL/6J mice were trained to self-administer METH (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) by poking their nose into an active hole under a fixed ratio schedule in daily 3-h sessions. After acquiring stable METH self-administration behavior, the mice were subjected to extinction training in the absence of both METH and METH-associated cues. Once the active nose-poking responses were extinguished, drug-primed and cue-induced reinstatement were investigated according to a within-subjects design. A priming injection of METH reliably reinstated the extinguished drug-seeking behavior in the absence of both METH and METH-associated cues. Interestingly, the drug-primed METH-seeking behavior disappeared within 2 months after withdrawal from METH, while cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished METH-seeking behavior lasted for at least 5 months after the withdrawal. A correlation study revealed that drug-primed, but not cue-induced, reinstatement behavior was positively correlated with the total amount of METH taken by individuals during METH self-administration. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the present reinstatement procedure for mouse model of relapse is useful and reliable, and different neural mechanisms may be involved in drug-primed and cue-induced METH-seeking behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-268
Number of pages8
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume177
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27-02-2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Cues
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Drug-Seeking Behavior
Self Administration
Nose
Recurrence
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Appointments and Schedules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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abstract = "It is essential to develop animal models to study the role of genetic factors in the relapse of drug-seeking behavior in genetically engineered mutant mice. This paper reports a typical model of drug-primed and cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished methamphetamine (METH)-seeking behavior in mice. C57BL/6J mice were trained to self-administer METH (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) by poking their nose into an active hole under a fixed ratio schedule in daily 3-h sessions. After acquiring stable METH self-administration behavior, the mice were subjected to extinction training in the absence of both METH and METH-associated cues. Once the active nose-poking responses were extinguished, drug-primed and cue-induced reinstatement were investigated according to a within-subjects design. A priming injection of METH reliably reinstated the extinguished drug-seeking behavior in the absence of both METH and METH-associated cues. Interestingly, the drug-primed METH-seeking behavior disappeared within 2 months after withdrawal from METH, while cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished METH-seeking behavior lasted for at least 5 months after the withdrawal. A correlation study revealed that drug-primed, but not cue-induced, reinstatement behavior was positively correlated with the total amount of METH taken by individuals during METH self-administration. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the present reinstatement procedure for mouse model of relapse is useful and reliable, and different neural mechanisms may be involved in drug-primed and cue-induced METH-seeking behavior.",
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Transient drug-primed but persistent cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished methamphetamine-seeking behavior in mice. / Yan, Yijin; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Nitta, Atsumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 177, No. 2, 27.02.2007, p. 261-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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