TT virus genotype changes frequently in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but rarely in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects

Hidenori Toyoda, Yoshihide Fukuda, Isao Nakano, Yoshiaki Katano, Shoichi Yokozaki, Kazuhiko Hayashi, Yoshinori Ito, Koji Suzuki, Hiroshi Nakano, Hidehiko Saito, Junki Takamatsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: TT virus (TTV), a novel DNA virus, was originally thought to be transmitted by transfusion. However, nonparenteral transmission is recently suspected to be a major mode of transmission. To investigate the possibility of reinfection with TTV in multiply transfused patients and to evaluate the significance of transfusion transmission of TTV in patients with hemophilia, serial changes in TTV genotype were investigated in three groups. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Serial changes in TTV genotype were investigated in 16 multiply transfused patients with hemophilia, 16 age-matched patients with chronic hepatitis C, and 16 age-matched healthy subjects. RESULTS: Mixed infection with multiple TTV genotypes was common in all groups. However, changes in TTV genotype were frequent in patients with hemophilia (15/16; 93.8%) but rare in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects (each group: 1/16; 6.3%). CONCLUSION: Changes in TTV genotype were frequently observed in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but not in patients with chronic hepatitis or in healthy subjects without risk of transfusion transmission. This difference may suggest that exposure to TTV or even reinfection occurs frequently in patients with hemophilia, which could be evidence of transfusion transmission of TTV in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1130-1135
Number of pages6
JournalTransfusion
Volume41
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26-09-2001

Fingerprint

Torque teno virus
Hemophilia A
Chronic Hepatitis C
Healthy Volunteers
Genotype
DNA Viruses
Chronic Hepatitis
Coinfection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Toyoda, Hidenori ; Fukuda, Yoshihide ; Nakano, Isao ; Katano, Yoshiaki ; Yokozaki, Shoichi ; Hayashi, Kazuhiko ; Ito, Yoshinori ; Suzuki, Koji ; Nakano, Hiroshi ; Saito, Hidehiko ; Takamatsu, Junki. / TT virus genotype changes frequently in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but rarely in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects. In: Transfusion. 2001 ; Vol. 41, No. 9. pp. 1130-1135.
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title = "TT virus genotype changes frequently in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but rarely in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: TT virus (TTV), a novel DNA virus, was originally thought to be transmitted by transfusion. However, nonparenteral transmission is recently suspected to be a major mode of transmission. To investigate the possibility of reinfection with TTV in multiply transfused patients and to evaluate the significance of transfusion transmission of TTV in patients with hemophilia, serial changes in TTV genotype were investigated in three groups. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Serial changes in TTV genotype were investigated in 16 multiply transfused patients with hemophilia, 16 age-matched patients with chronic hepatitis C, and 16 age-matched healthy subjects. RESULTS: Mixed infection with multiple TTV genotypes was common in all groups. However, changes in TTV genotype were frequent in patients with hemophilia (15/16; 93.8{\%}) but rare in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects (each group: 1/16; 6.3{\%}). CONCLUSION: Changes in TTV genotype were frequently observed in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but not in patients with chronic hepatitis or in healthy subjects without risk of transfusion transmission. This difference may suggest that exposure to TTV or even reinfection occurs frequently in patients with hemophilia, which could be evidence of transfusion transmission of TTV in this population.",
author = "Hidenori Toyoda and Yoshihide Fukuda and Isao Nakano and Yoshiaki Katano and Shoichi Yokozaki and Kazuhiko Hayashi and Yoshinori Ito and Koji Suzuki and Hiroshi Nakano and Hidehiko Saito and Junki Takamatsu",
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Toyoda, H, Fukuda, Y, Nakano, I, Katano, Y, Yokozaki, S, Hayashi, K, Ito, Y, Suzuki, K, Nakano, H, Saito, H & Takamatsu, J 2001, 'TT virus genotype changes frequently in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but rarely in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects', Transfusion, vol. 41, no. 9, pp. 1130-1135. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1537-2995.2001.41091130.x

TT virus genotype changes frequently in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but rarely in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects. / Toyoda, Hidenori; Fukuda, Yoshihide; Nakano, Isao; Katano, Yoshiaki; Yokozaki, Shoichi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Koji; Nakano, Hiroshi; Saito, Hidehiko; Takamatsu, Junki.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 41, No. 9, 26.09.2001, p. 1130-1135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - TT virus genotype changes frequently in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but rarely in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects

AU - Toyoda, Hidenori

AU - Fukuda, Yoshihide

AU - Nakano, Isao

AU - Katano, Yoshiaki

AU - Yokozaki, Shoichi

AU - Hayashi, Kazuhiko

AU - Ito, Yoshinori

AU - Suzuki, Koji

AU - Nakano, Hiroshi

AU - Saito, Hidehiko

AU - Takamatsu, Junki

PY - 2001/9/26

Y1 - 2001/9/26

N2 - BACKGROUND: TT virus (TTV), a novel DNA virus, was originally thought to be transmitted by transfusion. However, nonparenteral transmission is recently suspected to be a major mode of transmission. To investigate the possibility of reinfection with TTV in multiply transfused patients and to evaluate the significance of transfusion transmission of TTV in patients with hemophilia, serial changes in TTV genotype were investigated in three groups. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Serial changes in TTV genotype were investigated in 16 multiply transfused patients with hemophilia, 16 age-matched patients with chronic hepatitis C, and 16 age-matched healthy subjects. RESULTS: Mixed infection with multiple TTV genotypes was common in all groups. However, changes in TTV genotype were frequent in patients with hemophilia (15/16; 93.8%) but rare in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects (each group: 1/16; 6.3%). CONCLUSION: Changes in TTV genotype were frequently observed in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but not in patients with chronic hepatitis or in healthy subjects without risk of transfusion transmission. This difference may suggest that exposure to TTV or even reinfection occurs frequently in patients with hemophilia, which could be evidence of transfusion transmission of TTV in this population.

AB - BACKGROUND: TT virus (TTV), a novel DNA virus, was originally thought to be transmitted by transfusion. However, nonparenteral transmission is recently suspected to be a major mode of transmission. To investigate the possibility of reinfection with TTV in multiply transfused patients and to evaluate the significance of transfusion transmission of TTV in patients with hemophilia, serial changes in TTV genotype were investigated in three groups. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Serial changes in TTV genotype were investigated in 16 multiply transfused patients with hemophilia, 16 age-matched patients with chronic hepatitis C, and 16 age-matched healthy subjects. RESULTS: Mixed infection with multiple TTV genotypes was common in all groups. However, changes in TTV genotype were frequent in patients with hemophilia (15/16; 93.8%) but rare in patients with chronic hepatitis C and in healthy subjects (each group: 1/16; 6.3%). CONCLUSION: Changes in TTV genotype were frequently observed in multiply transfused patients with hemophilia but not in patients with chronic hepatitis or in healthy subjects without risk of transfusion transmission. This difference may suggest that exposure to TTV or even reinfection occurs frequently in patients with hemophilia, which could be evidence of transfusion transmission of TTV in this population.

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