Utility of glucagon stimulation test in type 1 diabetes after pancreas transplantation

Izumi Hiratsuka, Atsushi Suzuki, M. Kondo-Ando, H. Hirai, Y. Maeda, S. Sekiguchi-Ueda, M. Shibata, T. Takayanagi, M. Makino, N. Fukami, Taihei Ito, H. Sasaki, M. Kusaka, Takashi Kenmochi, K. Hoshinaga, M. Itoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Despite recent progress of immunosuppressive therapy with newly developed agents, long-term pancreatic graft survival after pancreas transplantation still remains low. Therefore, precise assessment of β-cell function after pancreas transplantation is necessary. Methods Pancreatic β-cell secretory activity was measured by means of the peripheral plasma fasting serum C-peptide (CPR) response to 1 mg of glucagon intravenously in 23 patients after pancreas transplantation. The utility of ΔCPR after injection was compared with other indices that reflect insulin secretion. Results When we performed the test, 6 patients still needed insulin injection after the transplantation. Mean CPR before and after glucagon intravenously were 1.9 ± 0.98 ng/mL and 4.6 ± 2.29 ng/mL, respectively. Fasting serum CPR, secretory unit of islet in transplantation (SUIT) index, and ΔCPR after glucagon injection were significantly different between insulin users and nonusers. During follow-up (501 ± 228 days), 3 patients could stop using insulin, and their increase of CPR (1.8 ± 0.5 ng/mL) was significantly higher than that in continuous insulin users (0.3 ± 0.3 ng/mL). Conclusion Fasting CPR, SUIT index, and ΔCPR after glucagon injection could reflect β-cell function for post-pancreas transplant patients, and glucagon stimulation test could give us additional information to predict insulin-free treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)967-969
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2014

Fingerprint

Pancreas Transplantation
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Glucagon
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin
Fasting
Islets of Langerhans Transplantation
Injections
C-Peptide
Graft Survival
Immunosuppressive Agents
Serum
Pancreas
Transplantation
Transplants
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Hiratsuka, Izumi ; Suzuki, Atsushi ; Kondo-Ando, M. ; Hirai, H. ; Maeda, Y. ; Sekiguchi-Ueda, S. ; Shibata, M. ; Takayanagi, T. ; Makino, M. ; Fukami, N. ; Ito, Taihei ; Sasaki, H. ; Kusaka, M. ; Kenmochi, Takashi ; Hoshinaga, K. ; Itoh, M. / Utility of glucagon stimulation test in type 1 diabetes after pancreas transplantation. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2014 ; Vol. 46, No. 3. pp. 967-969.
@article{d5db0580b89a4dae9f6dcae440c3f557,
title = "Utility of glucagon stimulation test in type 1 diabetes after pancreas transplantation",
abstract = "Background Despite recent progress of immunosuppressive therapy with newly developed agents, long-term pancreatic graft survival after pancreas transplantation still remains low. Therefore, precise assessment of β-cell function after pancreas transplantation is necessary. Methods Pancreatic β-cell secretory activity was measured by means of the peripheral plasma fasting serum C-peptide (CPR) response to 1 mg of glucagon intravenously in 23 patients after pancreas transplantation. The utility of ΔCPR after injection was compared with other indices that reflect insulin secretion. Results When we performed the test, 6 patients still needed insulin injection after the transplantation. Mean CPR before and after glucagon intravenously were 1.9 ± 0.98 ng/mL and 4.6 ± 2.29 ng/mL, respectively. Fasting serum CPR, secretory unit of islet in transplantation (SUIT) index, and ΔCPR after glucagon injection were significantly different between insulin users and nonusers. During follow-up (501 ± 228 days), 3 patients could stop using insulin, and their increase of CPR (1.8 ± 0.5 ng/mL) was significantly higher than that in continuous insulin users (0.3 ± 0.3 ng/mL). Conclusion Fasting CPR, SUIT index, and ΔCPR after glucagon injection could reflect β-cell function for post-pancreas transplant patients, and glucagon stimulation test could give us additional information to predict insulin-free treatment.",
author = "Izumi Hiratsuka and Atsushi Suzuki and M. Kondo-Ando and H. Hirai and Y. Maeda and S. Sekiguchi-Ueda and M. Shibata and T. Takayanagi and M. Makino and N. Fukami and Taihei Ito and H. Sasaki and M. Kusaka and Takashi Kenmochi and K. Hoshinaga and M. Itoh",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.11.027",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "967--969",
journal = "Transplantation Proceedings",
issn = "0041-1345",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "3",

}

Hiratsuka, I, Suzuki, A, Kondo-Ando, M, Hirai, H, Maeda, Y, Sekiguchi-Ueda, S, Shibata, M, Takayanagi, T, Makino, M, Fukami, N, Ito, T, Sasaki, H, Kusaka, M, Kenmochi, T, Hoshinaga, K & Itoh, M 2014, 'Utility of glucagon stimulation test in type 1 diabetes after pancreas transplantation', Transplantation Proceedings, vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 967-969. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.11.027

Utility of glucagon stimulation test in type 1 diabetes after pancreas transplantation. / Hiratsuka, Izumi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kondo-Ando, M.; Hirai, H.; Maeda, Y.; Sekiguchi-Ueda, S.; Shibata, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Makino, M.; Fukami, N.; Ito, Taihei; Sasaki, H.; Kusaka, M.; Kenmochi, Takashi; Hoshinaga, K.; Itoh, M.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 46, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 967-969.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Utility of glucagon stimulation test in type 1 diabetes after pancreas transplantation

AU - Hiratsuka, Izumi

AU - Suzuki, Atsushi

AU - Kondo-Ando, M.

AU - Hirai, H.

AU - Maeda, Y.

AU - Sekiguchi-Ueda, S.

AU - Shibata, M.

AU - Takayanagi, T.

AU - Makino, M.

AU - Fukami, N.

AU - Ito, Taihei

AU - Sasaki, H.

AU - Kusaka, M.

AU - Kenmochi, Takashi

AU - Hoshinaga, K.

AU - Itoh, M.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Background Despite recent progress of immunosuppressive therapy with newly developed agents, long-term pancreatic graft survival after pancreas transplantation still remains low. Therefore, precise assessment of β-cell function after pancreas transplantation is necessary. Methods Pancreatic β-cell secretory activity was measured by means of the peripheral plasma fasting serum C-peptide (CPR) response to 1 mg of glucagon intravenously in 23 patients after pancreas transplantation. The utility of ΔCPR after injection was compared with other indices that reflect insulin secretion. Results When we performed the test, 6 patients still needed insulin injection after the transplantation. Mean CPR before and after glucagon intravenously were 1.9 ± 0.98 ng/mL and 4.6 ± 2.29 ng/mL, respectively. Fasting serum CPR, secretory unit of islet in transplantation (SUIT) index, and ΔCPR after glucagon injection were significantly different between insulin users and nonusers. During follow-up (501 ± 228 days), 3 patients could stop using insulin, and their increase of CPR (1.8 ± 0.5 ng/mL) was significantly higher than that in continuous insulin users (0.3 ± 0.3 ng/mL). Conclusion Fasting CPR, SUIT index, and ΔCPR after glucagon injection could reflect β-cell function for post-pancreas transplant patients, and glucagon stimulation test could give us additional information to predict insulin-free treatment.

AB - Background Despite recent progress of immunosuppressive therapy with newly developed agents, long-term pancreatic graft survival after pancreas transplantation still remains low. Therefore, precise assessment of β-cell function after pancreas transplantation is necessary. Methods Pancreatic β-cell secretory activity was measured by means of the peripheral plasma fasting serum C-peptide (CPR) response to 1 mg of glucagon intravenously in 23 patients after pancreas transplantation. The utility of ΔCPR after injection was compared with other indices that reflect insulin secretion. Results When we performed the test, 6 patients still needed insulin injection after the transplantation. Mean CPR before and after glucagon intravenously were 1.9 ± 0.98 ng/mL and 4.6 ± 2.29 ng/mL, respectively. Fasting serum CPR, secretory unit of islet in transplantation (SUIT) index, and ΔCPR after glucagon injection were significantly different between insulin users and nonusers. During follow-up (501 ± 228 days), 3 patients could stop using insulin, and their increase of CPR (1.8 ± 0.5 ng/mL) was significantly higher than that in continuous insulin users (0.3 ± 0.3 ng/mL). Conclusion Fasting CPR, SUIT index, and ΔCPR after glucagon injection could reflect β-cell function for post-pancreas transplant patients, and glucagon stimulation test could give us additional information to predict insulin-free treatment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899567581&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84899567581&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.11.027

DO - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.11.027

M3 - Article

C2 - 24767392

AN - SCOPUS:84899567581

VL - 46

SP - 967

EP - 969

JO - Transplantation Proceedings

JF - Transplantation Proceedings

SN - 0041-1345

IS - 3

ER -