Validation of the Martin method to estimate low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in Japanese populations and a modified method for laboratory information system application

Hidekazu Ishida, Yasuko Yamamoto, Midori Saito, Yuya Ishihara, Takashi Fujita, Mariko Ishida, Yohei Kato, Yuzuru Nohisa, Hidetoshi Matsunami, Masao Takemura, Tadayoshi Hata, Hiroyasu Ito, Kuniaki Saito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: High concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We validated the efficacy of the Martin method is useful in the estimation of LDL-C concentrations was validated in Japanese populations and derived a modified Martin method for easy laboratory information system applications. Methods: We created 3 subject groups, including 2664 health check-up participants registered with the Resource Center for Health Science, 29,806 clinical patients (A) in the Gifu University Hospital, and 113,716 clinical patients (B) in the Fujita Health University Hospital. Each method to estimate serum LDL-C concentrations (Friedewald formula, Martin method and modified Martin method) was validated by correlation analysis with serum LDL-C concentrations measured using a direct method Results: The correlation coefficients with the direct method in terms of the Friedewald formula, Martin method, and modified Martin method were 0.963, 0.972 and 0.970 in the health check-up participants; 0.946, 0.962 and 0.961 in clinical patients A; and 0.961, 0.979 and 0.978 in clinical patients B, respectively. Concordance ratios with using the direct method in the Friedewald formula, Martin method and modified Martin method were 82.8%, 85.5% and 85.3% in the health check-up participants; 76.4%, 80.5% and 80.2% in clinical patients A; and 76.1%, 82.6% and 82.6% in clinical patients B, respectively. Conclusion: Our results show that the Martin and modified Martin methods display good performance in terms of the estimation of LDL-C concentrations among triglyceride concentrations of a wide range, and they may thus be useful for estimating LDL-C concentrations.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Clinical Biochemistry
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Validation of the Martin method to estimate low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations in Japanese populations and a modified method for laboratory information system application'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this