Workplace-related chronic cough on a mushroom farm

Hiroshi Tanaka, Toyohiro Saikai, Hiroyuki Sugawara, Isao Takeya, Kazunori Tsunematsu, Akihiro Matsuura, Shosaku Abe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Mushroom spores have frequently been associated with respiratory allergy. The aims of this study were to elucidate the incidence and causes of chronic cough in a mushroom farm. Methods: Participants were 69 mushroom workers who produce Hypsizigus marmoreus (Bunashimeji) and 35 control subjects. We excluded six workers because they had had asthma or allergic rhinitis before working. Participants completed a cross-sectional health survey 2 years after starting work at the mushroom farm. Results: The mean airborne endotoxin levels in the harvesting and packing rooms were approximately 60-fold higher than those in the offices. Of 63 workers, 42 workers (67%) reported chronic cough after working on this farm, 19 workers had no cough, while 2 workers had hypersensitivity pneumonitis develop to the spore, which has been previously reported by us. Of the 42 workers with cough, 6 workers had organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS), 18 workers had postnasal drip syndrome, 15 workers had cough variant asthma, and 3 workers had eosinophilic bronchitis. Seventy-one percent of the workers noticed the cough in the first 3 months, and the mean latent period in ODTS workers was the shortest. The cough had a trend to improve or disappear after weekend holidays. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness but not FEV1/FVC% in the 42 workers with cough was significantly (p < 0.001) increased as compared with the control subjects. Conclusions: Working on a mushroom farm carries a significant risk for chronic cough from inhalation of mushroom spores, and we suggest that elevated airborne endotoxin on this farm is the cause.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1080-1085
Number of pages6
JournalChest
Volume122
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-01-2002

Fingerprint

Agaricales
Cough
Workplace
Spores
Poisons
Dust
Endotoxins
Asthma
Extrinsic Allergic Alveolitis
Farms
Holidays
Bronchitis
Health Surveys
Inhalation
Hypersensitivity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Tanaka, H., Saikai, T., Sugawara, H., Takeya, I., Tsunematsu, K., Matsuura, A., & Abe, S. (2002). Workplace-related chronic cough on a mushroom farm. Chest, 122(3), 1080-1085. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.122.3.1080
Tanaka, Hiroshi ; Saikai, Toyohiro ; Sugawara, Hiroyuki ; Takeya, Isao ; Tsunematsu, Kazunori ; Matsuura, Akihiro ; Abe, Shosaku. / Workplace-related chronic cough on a mushroom farm. In: Chest. 2002 ; Vol. 122, No. 3. pp. 1080-1085.
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Tanaka, H, Saikai, T, Sugawara, H, Takeya, I, Tsunematsu, K, Matsuura, A & Abe, S 2002, 'Workplace-related chronic cough on a mushroom farm', Chest, vol. 122, no. 3, pp. 1080-1085. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.122.3.1080

Workplace-related chronic cough on a mushroom farm. / Tanaka, Hiroshi; Saikai, Toyohiro; Sugawara, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Isao; Tsunematsu, Kazunori; Matsuura, Akihiro; Abe, Shosaku.

In: Chest, Vol. 122, No. 3, 01.01.2002, p. 1080-1085.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Saikai, Toyohiro

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Tanaka H, Saikai T, Sugawara H, Takeya I, Tsunematsu K, Matsuura A et al. Workplace-related chronic cough on a mushroom farm. Chest. 2002 Jan 1;122(3):1080-1085. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.122.3.1080