Chromatin immunoprecipitation for studying transcriptional regulation in Xenopus oocytes and tadpoles.

David Stewart, Akihiro Tomita, Yun Bo Shi, Jiemin Wong

研究成果: Review article

13 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Understanding the accurate temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression during development requires knowledge of the spectrum of transcription factors and cofactors involved and their functional interplay with chromatin. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) has become a powerful technique that allows us to do so. A typical ChIP assay involves (1) treating cells or tissues with formaldehyde to rapidly crosslink chromatin-associated proteins to DNA, (2) shearing chromatin by sonication into small fragments, (3) immunoprecipitation of the proteins of interest, (4) reversal of crosslinking, and (5) quantitating the specific associated DNA sequences by PCR. Here we present and discuss the protocols we have developed over the years for ChIP assays using Xenopus oocytes and tadpole tissues as experimental materials.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)165-181
ページ数17
ジャーナルMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
322
出版物ステータスPublished - 01-01-2006
外部発表Yes

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Chromatin Immunoprecipitation
Xenopus
Chromatin
Oocytes
Larva
Sonication
Gene Expression Regulation
Immunoprecipitation
Formaldehyde
Proteins
Transcription Factors
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

これを引用

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Chromatin immunoprecipitation for studying transcriptional regulation in Xenopus oocytes and tadpoles. / Stewart, David; Tomita, Akihiro; Shi, Yun Bo; Wong, Jiemin.

:: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), 巻 322, 01.01.2006, p. 165-181.

研究成果: Review article

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