Does far transfer exist? Negative evidence from chess, music, and working memory training

Giovanni Sala, Fernand Gobet

研究成果: Article査読

66 被引用数 (Scopus)

抄録

Chess masters and expert musicians appear to be, on average, more intelligent than the general population. Some researchers have thus claimed that playing chess or learning music enhances children’s cognitive abilities and academic attainment. We here present two meta-analyses assessing the effect of chess and music instruction on children’s cognitive and academic skills. A third meta-analysis evaluated the effects of working memory training—a cognitive skill correlated with music and chess expertise—on the same variables. The results show small to moderate effects. However, the effect sizes are inversely related to the quality of the experimental design (e.g., presence of active control groups). This pattern of results casts serious doubts on the effectiveness of chess, music, and working memory training. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings; extend the debate to other types of training such as spatial training, brain training, and video games; and conclude that far transfer of learning rarely occurs.

本文言語English
ページ(範囲)515-520
ページ数6
ジャーナルCurrent Directions in Psychological Science
26
6
DOI
出版ステータスPublished - 12-2017
外部発表はい

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

フィンガープリント 「Does far transfer exist? Negative evidence from chess, music, and working memory training」の研究トピックを掘り下げます。これらがまとまってユニークなフィンガープリントを構成します。

引用スタイル