The long-lasting effects of cross-fostering on the emotional behavior in ICR mice

Lingling Lu, Takayoshi Mamiya, Ping Lu, Minae Niwa, Akihiro Mouri, Li Bo Zou, Taku Nagai, Masayuki Hiramatsu, Toshitaka Nabeshima

研究成果: Article

24 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Early-life stress during the postnatal period could precipitate long-lasting alterations in the functional properties underlying emotional expression in humans, but how the psychological stress of cross-fostering affects emotional behavior during adulthood in mice remains primarily unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effects of cross-fostering on the emotional behavior and cognitive functions of ICR offspring in adulthood. Cross-fostering was performed from postnatal day 7 for 3 weeks. Mice were divided into three groups: (1) biological group: pups born from ICR dams fostered by their original mothers; (2) in-foster group: pups born from ICR dams but adopted by other ICR dams and (3) cross-foster group: ICR pups adopted by C57 dams. ICR mice were subjected to behavioral experiments at the age of 8 weeks. Emotional behaviors in the cross-fostered mice were significantly altered in the open-field, elevated plus maze and forced swimming tests, as well as social interaction tests. However, the cross-fostered mice showed normal memory function in the Y-maze and novel object recognition tests. The contents of serotonin metabolisms were decreased in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus indicated the deficit of serotoninergic neuronal function by cross-fostering. These findings suggested that the early-life stress of cross-fostering induced long-lasting emotional abnormalities, which might be possibly related to alterations of serotonin metabolisms.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)172-178
ページ数7
ジャーナルBehavioural Brain Research
198
発行部数1
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 02-03-2009
外部発表Yes

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Inbred ICR Mouse
Foster Home Care
Psychological Stress
Serotonin
Interpersonal Relations
Prefrontal Cortex
Cognition
Hippocampus
Mothers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

これを引用

Lu, Lingling ; Mamiya, Takayoshi ; Lu, Ping ; Niwa, Minae ; Mouri, Akihiro ; Zou, Li Bo ; Nagai, Taku ; Hiramatsu, Masayuki ; Nabeshima, Toshitaka. / The long-lasting effects of cross-fostering on the emotional behavior in ICR mice. :: Behavioural Brain Research. 2009 ; 巻 198, 番号 1. pp. 172-178.
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abstract = "Early-life stress during the postnatal period could precipitate long-lasting alterations in the functional properties underlying emotional expression in humans, but how the psychological stress of cross-fostering affects emotional behavior during adulthood in mice remains primarily unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effects of cross-fostering on the emotional behavior and cognitive functions of ICR offspring in adulthood. Cross-fostering was performed from postnatal day 7 for 3 weeks. Mice were divided into three groups: (1) biological group: pups born from ICR dams fostered by their original mothers; (2) in-foster group: pups born from ICR dams but adopted by other ICR dams and (3) cross-foster group: ICR pups adopted by C57 dams. ICR mice were subjected to behavioral experiments at the age of 8 weeks. Emotional behaviors in the cross-fostered mice were significantly altered in the open-field, elevated plus maze and forced swimming tests, as well as social interaction tests. However, the cross-fostered mice showed normal memory function in the Y-maze and novel object recognition tests. The contents of serotonin metabolisms were decreased in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus indicated the deficit of serotoninergic neuronal function by cross-fostering. These findings suggested that the early-life stress of cross-fostering induced long-lasting emotional abnormalities, which might be possibly related to alterations of serotonin metabolisms.",
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The long-lasting effects of cross-fostering on the emotional behavior in ICR mice. / Lu, Lingling; Mamiya, Takayoshi; Lu, Ping; Niwa, Minae; Mouri, Akihiro; Zou, Li Bo; Nagai, Taku; Hiramatsu, Masayuki; Nabeshima, Toshitaka.

:: Behavioural Brain Research, 巻 198, 番号 1, 02.03.2009, p. 172-178.

研究成果: Article

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